Tag archive for ‘trails’

Hiking – Haines Trails

Hiking – Haines Trails

Battery Point Trail Length 1.2 miles, no elevation gain, location: from Fort Seward, walk east along Beach Rd. and up hill to end of (about 1.25 miles past Portage Cove Campground). Trail leads to beach (1 mile) and across headland to Kelgaya Point (1.2 miles). Mt. Riley Trails Three routes to summit, Mud Bay Road, […]

National Historic Trails – Iditarod

National Historic Trails – Iditarod

Jurisdiction: Bureau of Land Management Established: 1978 Route: 2,450 miles, main route 900 (3,945 km, main route 1,450) The Iditarod is a system of historic trails made famous by Alaska gold prospectors and their dog teams during the late 19th and early 20th century gold rush. Most of the trail is usable only during Alaska’s […]

Gates of the Arctic National Park

Gates of the Arctic National Park

Arctic Alaska is one of the greatest wilderness areas in the world. It is a delicate balance of tundra, boreal forest, coastal plains, and mountains. It’s vastness is deceiving because the Arctic ecosystem is extremely fragile and is easily impacted by man’s activities. The Arctic climate produces permafrost and marginal growth conditions for vegetation. Land […]

Monte Sano State Park

Monte Sano State Park

General Location. On Monte Sano Mtn., adjacent to Huntsville. Length & Difficulty: 2 miles; easy. Elevation Change: 200 feet maximum. What’s Special: Interesting rock formation. Topo Maps: Huntsville USGS 7.5 degree quad.

Huntsville Land Trust Trails

Huntsville Land Trust Trails

The Huntsville Land Trust The Huntsville Land Trust is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving nature within Madison County. The Trust acquires land by buying it or encouraging donations from property owners. Monte Sano is their biggest project; over the last ten years they’ve acquired the majority of the land on the west face of […]

Do not alter the signals or marking of trails

Do not alter the signals or marking of trails

Do not alter the signs or markings on the trails. This means not erase paint marks (or doing other nonsense that can be confused with existing ones) or disassemble the milestones (artificially accumulated piles of stones) that are on the way, as they play a primary role in signaling.

Wildland Ethics – Avoid Places Where Impact Is Just Beginning

Most campsites can recover completely from a certain level of use. However, a threshold is eventually reached where the regenerative power of the vegetation cannot keep pace with the amount of trampling. Once this threshold is reached the site will deteriorate more rapidly with continued use. This will result in the development of an established […]

Concentrate Impacts in High-Use Areas

Concentrate Impacts in High-Use Areas

Concentrating use in popular or high-use areas is a simple and effective method to reduce the impact of a backcountry visit. Main travel corridors and popular destinations usually have well-established trails and campsites. Continued use causes little additional impact to these features although overcrowding diminishes the overall experience for some. Respect other visitors’ need for […]

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